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Roundhouse & turntable


Robert Scott
 

How would the railroads pull a cold steamer from the roundhouse onto the turntable and get it out of the way, or insert a cold engine for repairs? Would the turn table be large enough to accommodate a little shunt engine too? A winch? 
They could use pry bars on the wheels. seen that done with freight cars.

Bob


CustomDeSigner ; D. Brelsford
 

If memory serves me correctly, they used small steamer like a switcher to move it around. It really all depended on what they were trying to get done,even a old 44 tonne switcher was used. Check a search engine for a much better answer. Good luck.


On Fri, Jan 8, 2021 at 7:12 PM, Robert Scott via groups.io
<sparky1bob@...> wrote:
How would the railroads pull a cold steamer from the roundhouse onto the turntable and get it out of the way, or insert a cold engine for repairs? Would the turn table be large enough to accommodate a little shunt engine too? A winch? 
They could use pry bars on the wheels. seen that done with freight cars.

Bob


Adam Richards
 

All sorts of things could be done in extremis - tenders could be detached emptied and turned separately, there could be other motive power employed (shunting engines, stationary engines with capstans, traction engines, tractors, ponies, horses and of course “Armstrong”).

Armstrong, for my U.K. friends, is a US term for shank’s pony or the RN 2-6-heave - as in the story of Henry the Green Engine in Thomas the Tank Engine book - the one in which Sir Topham Hat refused to help.


Alan Cox
 

On Fri, 08 Jan 2021 21:39:52 -0800
"Adam Richards" <adamjmrichards@gmail.com> wrote:

All sorts of things could be done in extremis - tenders could be detached emptied and turned separately, there could be other motive power employed (shunting engines, stationary engines with capstans, traction engines, tractors, ponies, horses and of course “Armstrong”).

Armstrong, for my U.K. friends, is a US term for shank’s pony or the RN 2-6-heave - as in the story of Henry the Green Engine in Thomas the Tank Engine book - the one in which Sir Topham Hat refused to help.
In the UK at least we had very few roundhouse type arrangements. The
turntable was often only used for turning locomotives because on an
intensively used rail network having the turntable break and all your
locomotives stranded was a bit of an embarrassing mess.

You can drop the ash and the fire on a UK locomotive at least (dunno about
US) and then use the existing raised steam to put it to bed.

Folks might find this fun (1951 film on the subject starts at 35:50 or so)

https://youtu.be/vljRhfLHPc0?t=2168

as you can see it takes a lot of time to cool down.

Alan