Topics

+Topography #background


Robert Scott
 

Good morning.
There has been interest in having a 3D view of our designs, before commiting saw to wood. Often, what looks good on "paper" doesn't work out in practice.
Attached is a layout file, Beta 3.0, with a color topo created in layers 14 to 21. Play with the colors, turn the layers on and off, see how they have been modified.

I am interested in how well the topo layers work, how well they aid in visualizing the finished product,
It's also a hell of a lot of work. Shortcuts, anyone??

B


Joost van der Waa
 

Something like this?
I used Xtrkcad viewer, see http://mwik.altervista.org/


Robert Scott
 

Have the viewer thanks.
It's the topography between the tracks and structures that I am trying to represent with shading, light to dark, low to high.
Is it successful?

B

On Monday, October 12, 2020, 11:10:50 a.m. EDT, Joost van der Waa <register@...> wrote:


Something like this?
I used Xtrkcad viewer, see http://mwik.altervista.org/


Joost van der Waa
 

Hi Robert,

For me the shading was not really showing the topography. Actually, If you hadn't asked this, I would not even have noticed it in the 3D-view.
Give the fact that the Xtrackcad objects are flat, the 3D-view will always be limited.
For me the 3D-view helped me to show some errors I made in indicating the proper height.

Joost


Robert Scott
 

Good day Joost,
There are topo maps around that use shading to represent elevation above a reference point. The advantage is the drawing is not cluttered with lines and numbers.
This work has shown me that the color pallette works in inscrutable ways, making it very difficult to create and save a suitable gradation of colors.
Being able to "spray paint" the layout table, in the manner of Windows Paint, would be a tremendous help. Export the layout to Windows Paint, do the shading, then import back??
I do believe that this type of design aid would result in "better builds." The landscape can be used to create view blocks and control the perspective of viewers, but without tracks and the table, it is difficult to visualize the landscape needed as part of the design process.
I would guess it's all about "better builds."

B

On Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 08:03:12 a.m. EDT, Joost van der Waa <register@...> wrote:


Hi Robert,

For me the shading was not really showing the topography. Actually, If you hadn't asked this, I would not even have noticed it in the 3D-view.
Give the fact that the Xtrackcad objects are flat, the 3D-view will always be limited.
For me the 3D-view helped me to show some errors I made in indicating the proper height.

Joost


Adam Richards
 

This work has shown me that the color pallette works in inscrutable ways, making it very difficult to create and save a suitable gradation of colors.

This is a hangover from the days when XTrackCAD was born.  Those of long memory may recall that early graphics hw support had to use a limited "palette" of colors. You could have any color you wanted but only 16 or 256 different colors.  So it is that today, the colors users input are still "clustered" into a limited palette by seeing how far "off" a color is from ones already in use. 

One of the advantages of moving to a universal GTK3 would be to get away from this heritage and just use the "real" colors as input. 

In that area are also the potential of including transparency (alpha) with colors, gradient fills (and maybe pattern/hatch fills as well). 

Spray painting, however, is likely going to be beyond a vector-based (rather than raster-based) program. Things get complex with zooms and so forth. 

Adam


Robert Scott
 

Thanks for the information. I doubted that we could "spray paint".
That is the effect I have in mind, smooth shading. Multiple polygons work.

B
On Monday, October 19, 2020, 04:59:28 p.m. EDT, Adam Richards <adamjmrichards@...> wrote:


This work has shown me that the color pallette works in inscrutable ways, making it very difficult to create and save a suitable gradation of colors.

This is a hangover from the days when XTrackCAD was born.  Those of long memory may recall that early graphics hw support had to use a limited "palette" of colors. You could have any color you wanted but only 16 or 256 different colors.  So it is that today, the colors users input are still "clustered" into a limited palette by seeing how far "off" a color is from ones already in use. 

One of the advantages of moving to a universal GTK3 would be to get away from this heritage and just use the "real" colors as input. 

In that area are also the potential of including transparency (alpha) with colors, gradient fills (and maybe pattern/hatch fills as well). 

Spray painting, however, is likely going to be beyond a vector-based (rather than raster-based) program. Things get complex with zooms and so forth. 

Adam